Wednesday, 17 April 2013

Wedding Wednesday - Tillin/Tillen/Tilling/Till?n England and Wales Marriages

One of the benefits of using Custodian as my records database is that I can quickly analyse the data and start to produce statistics about my Tillin One Name Study.

So I have started with Marriages.

If I filter my name index I find that there are 5,307 marriage index records in my database. But this doesn't mean there are 5,307 marriages as each name referenced counts as a separate record. So my next filter is by surname to include those with surnames starting with TILL. This reduces the number to 3,160 names. I then removed any references where the person with the surname starting with TILL was the spouse and not the primary Tillin reference. Finally, I got to 3,061 records from the indexes between 1837 and 2005 (according to Ancestry.co.uk) in England and Wales.

The split by surname was as follows

TILLING - 2679
TILLIN - 238
TILLEN - 136
TILLON - 4
TILLYN - 2
TILLAN - 2

which is what I would have expected as TILLING is a much more common surname.

To further analyse the data I exported it to an Excel spreadsheet and used a pivot table for easy analysis.
By decade, it looks like the most popular decade for marriages was the 1960s.



If I look at the TILLIN name itself the top 5 registration districts are Camberwell, Reading, Windsor, Kettering and Bradfield.  This is sort of what I would expect but the fact that Kettering has made the top 5 places was a bit of a surprise although all of these records were from 1936 onwards.

If I look at TILLING the top 5 registration districts are Bristol, Cheltenham, Swindon, Stroud and Warrington. This time Warrington is the surprise as I haven't had very many records from the North of England so that is a new area to look at.

The top 5 TILLEN registration districts were Newbury, Reading, Bradfield, Wokingham and Brentfield.

At the moment I'm not sure what this tells me but I find the geographical spread of the surnames quite interesting and maybe I need to look at some sort of mapping analysis.




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